WTME_arrow_mark.png

Welcome to WTME! Where would you like to go today?

Swedish Waffles

Swedish Waffles

It's officially winter. The high was below freezing today, I can't feel my face when I'm outside (I don't love it), and yesterday it snowed (small yay!). Naturally, I decided to spend my MLK Day baking since I didn't have to be at work and I had just bought some new props for food photography. Helloooooo dollar bill kitchen towel!

Every now and then I seriously crave Swedish waffles so they were first on my list today. These waffles themselves aren't sweet but you eat them smeared with whipped cream and fruit jam so fear not. The key to making these waffles is cooking them long enough - you want a nice brown and crispy exterior. Also, these puppies are made thin, in a regular waffle iron, not a deep Belgian waffle maker. 

In my family waffles were always a treat and we would eat them for lunch outside in the spring. Swedes actually love waffles so much that the country has a waffle day. It stemmed out of the mispronunciation of a religious holiday and somehow stuck. Waffle day falls on March 25 each year and I highly encourage you to celebrate! 

Swedish Waffles

Makes 8 waffles

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • Heavy cream, whipped to stiff peaks, for serving
  • Fruit jam or preserves (I prefer strawberry or raspberry), for serving

In a mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, eggs, milk, and butter. Whisk until smooth.

Preheat non-stick waffle iron. Pour about 1/3 cup batter on the iron, close, and cook until browned and crispy. Repeat with the remaining batter. Serve with whipped cream and jam. 

Chocolate S'mores Cookies

Chocolate S'mores Cookies

Paprika Cheddar Crackers

Paprika Cheddar Crackers